Good sources of protein

Table 1: Protein content of some common foods found in the diet

Food type Protein content (g) per 100g

Meat protein

Meat Chicken breast (grilled without skin)
Beef steak (lean grilled)
Lamb chop (lean grilled)
Pork chop (lean grilled)
32.0
31.0
29.2
31.6
Fish Tuna (canned in brine)
Mackerel (grilled)
Salmon (grilled)
Cod (grilled)
23.5
20.8
24.2
20.8
Seafood Prawns
Mussels
Crabsticks
22.6
16.7
10.0
Eggs Chicken eggs 12.5
Dairy Whole milk
Semi-skimmed milk
Skimmed milk
Cheddar cheese
Half-fat cheddar
Cottage cheese
Whole milk yogurt
Low fat yogurt (plain)
3.3
3.4
3.4
25.4
32.7
12.6
5.7
4.8

Plant protein

Pulses Red lentils
Chickpeas
7.6
8.4
Beans Kidney beans
Baked beans
Tofu (soya bean steamed)
6.9
5.2
8.1
Grains Wheat flour (brown)
Bread (brown)
Bread (white)
Rice (easy cook boiled)
Oatmeal
Pasta (fresh cooked)
12.6
7.9
7.9
2.6
11.2
6.6
Nuts Almonds
Walnuts
Hazelnuts
21.1
14.7
14.1

Adults and children should consume two to three servings of protein every day. If plant sources dominate, it is important to make sure that different types are consumed.

One typical portion size equates to:

• 100g of lean boneless meat (red and poultry)
• 140g of fish
• 2 medium eggs
• 3 tablespoons of seeds or nuts.

It is important to choose lower fat protein-rich foods, such as lean meats or reduced fat dairy products as some high protein foods can also be high in saturated fat. This will help minimise the risk of developing cardiovascular disease.